Uremia – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2018 by

A patient may develop a toxic disease called uremia if their kidneys become damaged. This condition involves the accumulation of urea in the blood.

The kidneys normally send toxins (body waste) out in your urine. However, if a person has uremia, the toxins end up in their bloodstream. These toxins include creatinine and urea.

Uremia is a severe condition. When left untreated, the disease may even be life-threatening. It is a major symptom of renal failure. Uremia is also a sign of the last stages of chronic kidney disease.

Uremia is caused by extreme and, often, irreversible damage to the kidneys. The condition is often associated with chronic kidney disease.

Chronic kidney disease can be caused by:

  • Diabetes (both Type 1 and 2)
  • Enlarged prostate
  • High blood pressure
  • Inflammation of the glomeruli (the filtering units in the kidneys)
  • Inflammation of the kidney’s tubules along with the structures around them
  • Kidney stones that block the urinary tract for an extended period
  • Polycystic kidney disease
  • Recurring kidney infections
  • Some types of cancer

Known side effects of uremia

When a patient first develops chronic kidney disease, they may not have any noticeable symptoms. But once uremia begins, their kidneys have already been heavily damaged.

The side effects of uremia usually include:

  • Cramping in the legs
  • Extreme fatigue or tiredness
  • A headache
  • Little or no appetite
  • Nausea
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Vomiting

Risk factors for uremia may include:

  • Hypotension/low blood pressure
  • Intake of several medicines, like intravenous contrast material or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
  • Recent infection
  • Recent surgery
  • Recent trauma or injury

Body systems harmed by uremia

Uremia may cause severe complications. When left untreated by dialysis or a kidney transplant, the condition may even cause death.

A patient being treated with dialysis can suffer from complications such as:

  • Amyloidosis, a rare disease that causes the joints to be painful, stiff, and retain fluid
  • Cardiovascular issues
  • Depression
  • Heart attacks, which can lead to death
  • Severe itching from the imbalance of minerals

Food items or nutrients that may prevent uremia

Patients with uremia must follow a strict and healthy diet. Consult a healthcare professional to determine the best diet for your condition.

As your condition improves, slowly incorporate the following foods into your diet:

  • Fruit juices
  • Soups
  • Vegetables
  • Vegetable purées

However, you must avoid eating eggs, pulses, and strong cheeses. Limit your intake of foods that are high in sodium, like salt.

Treatments, management plans for uremia

Because uremia is a medical condition that needs immediate treatment, patients with the disease require hospitalization.

Treatment for uremia aims to address the underlying cause of the disease. A healthcare professional may need to adjust a patient’s medications for certain autoimmune diseases, or they may recommend surgery to remove a blockage (e.g., a kidney stone). Patients with uremia may need to take blood pressure medication and medication to better control diabetes.

Some patients with uremia may require dialysis. Dialysis involves a machine that will function as an artificial kidney and filter an individual’s blood.

Other people with uremia may require a kidney transplant. Replacing the diseased kidney with a healthy one can help prevent further kidney problems. In some cases, patients have to wait for at least several years for a kidney. In the meantime, they may need dialysis while they wait.

Where to learn more

Summary

A patient may develop a toxic disease called uremia if their kidneys become damaged. This condition involves the accumulation of urea in the blood.

The side effects of uremia usually include cramping in the legs, extreme fatigue or tiredness, or a headache.

Uremia may cause severe complications like amyloidosis, cardiovascular issues, or depression. When left untreated by dialysis or a kidney transplant, the condition may even cause death.

Patients with uremia must follow a strict and healthy diet. Consult a healthcare professional to determine the best diet for your condition.

Treatment for uremia aims to address the underlying cause of the disease. Options include medications, surgery, dialysis, and a kidney transplant.

Sources include:

MedicalNewsToday.com

Healthline.com

PrimeHealth.com

OneHowTo.com



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