Scabies – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Tuesday, June 26, 2018 by

Scabies is a condition that can affect anyone. The itchy skin condition – caused by a microscopic mite known as Sarcoptes scabei – is a found all over the world. In particular, being in densely populated areas where there is skin-to-skin contact between people could increase your risk of being infected. This is seen in hospitals and nursing homes, and even in child care centers. Transmission can also occur during sexual activity, as well as through sharing items like clothes, towels, and bedding.

However, a person who has come into contact with someone with crusted scabies – a severe form of the condition – is more likely to be infected. Crusted scabies is a condition that is commonly seen in people with a compromised immune system, as well as the elderly, disabled, and debilitated. Those with crusted scabies (also called Norwegian scabies) have thick crusts of skin that can hold a large number of mites and their eggs. These may not show the itchy rash known in regular cases, but they can spread the infection quickly and should be treated to prevent an outbreak.

Contrary to what some believe, a person cannot be infected with scabies after being exposed to mite-infested pets.

Known risk factors and symptoms of scabies

The first symptom that a person infected with scabies will experience is intense itching, especially at night. Silvery lines on the skin will appear after with a dot on one end, indicating the presence of an egg-laying mite.

While the rash can appear anywhere, it is usually seen between the fingers. In some cases, these appear as red spots on the skin, which can spread across the whole body, except the head and neck.

Body systems affected by scabies

Scabies can result in an intense scratching of the skin. When the skin is broken or injured, complications may occur when bacteria found in the skin enter the body and infect it. These include Staphylococcus aureus or beta-hemolytic streptococci.

Food items or nutrients that may prevent scabies

If a person has scabies, he could modify his diet to boost his recovery and reduce symptoms by adding these recommended food items.

  • Black walnuts. These contain protein, which is known to improve immune function and prevent further infections from the rash.
  • Rhubarb. The vegetable is a natural anti-parasitic, according to naturopathic medicine practitioners, and it’s also an excellent source of vitamin C, which can help heal the skin after a rash.
  • Garlic. The spice is known to contain nutrients that help with skin repair and improve nerve health.

Treatments, management options for scabies

Here are some ways to naturally help relieve the pain and itching felt during scabies.

  • Tea tree oil. It has an anti-parasitic activity that inhibits its growth. To use, mix equal parts of tea tree oil and olive oil and dab it on the affected area using a cotton ball. You can also use it in the bath by adding at least 10-12 drops to lukewarm water.
  • White vinegar. The acetic acid in white vinegar can create a toxic environment for the mites, effectively killing them off. Mix equal parts of vinegar and water, and apply using a cotton ball on the affected area. Let stand, then rinse with lukewarm water.
  • Neem. The leaves and the oil of the neem tree can be used to treat scabies. Apply the oil directly on the area, or create a topical paste by soaking the leaves in warm water then crushing them.

Where to learn more

Summary

Scabies is an itchy skin condition caused by a microscopic mite known as Sarcoptes scabei.

Scabies is transmitted through direct skin contact and through sharing items like clothes, towels, and bedding. A severe form, called crusted scabies, can spread the infection quickly and should be treated to prevent an outbreak.

Scabies, which causes an intense scratching of the skin, can lead to complications may occur when bacteria found in the skin enter the body and infect it.

Sources include:

MedLinePlus.gov

CDC.gov

NHS.uk

MedicineNet.com

Livestrong.com

DoctorsHealthPress.com



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