Q fever – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Saturday, June 16, 2018 by

Q fever refers to an infection caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii, a virus usually found in cattle, goats, and sheep all over the world.

Humans can develop Q fever if they inhale dust contaminated by infected animals. The “birth products” of infected animals (e.g., amniotic fluid and placenta) contain the highest amounts of bacteria.

Q fever is linked to mild flu-like symptoms. However, many patients with the infection don’t experience any symptoms.

Rare cases of Q fever may develop into a more serious form if the infection is chronic. Chronic Q fever persists for six months or longer. A more serious form of Q fever may also develop if the infection is recurrent. Individuals with heart valve problems or weak immune systems are at the highest risk of developing these types of Q fever. Chronic Q fever is severe, and it may damage a person’s vital organs, such as the brain, heart, liver, and lungs.

Q fever is also called query fever.

Known side effects of Q fever

The side effects of Q fever usually include:

  • Chest pain
  • Chills or sweats
  • Diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting
  • Fatigue/tiredness
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches
  • Non-productive cough
  • Stomach pain
  • Weight loss

People at risk for developing Q fever may include:

  • Farmers
  • Veterinarians
  • Those who live close to farms
  • Those who work around sheep
  • Those who work in the dairy industry
  • Those who work in meat processing facilities
  • Those who work in research laboratories with C. burnetii
  • Those who work in research laboratories with livestock

Body systems harmed by Q fever

Complications linked to Q fever may include:

  • Encephalitis – Brain infection.
  • Endocarditis – The inflammation of the inner membrane of the heart. Endocarditis can severely affect the heart valves.
  • Fatigue syndrome – Extreme fatigue is linked to prolonged disability.
  • Infection of the retina
  • Liver damage – Liver damage may progress to hepatitis.
  • Meningitis – The inflammation of the membranes around the brain and spinal cord.
  • Myocarditis – Inflammation of the covering of the heart
  • Osteomyelitis – Bone infection.
  • Pneumonia – The lungs may be infected because of a lack of oxygen. This can cause respiratory problems.
  • Pregnancy-related health conditions – A pregnant woman with Q fever is at risk of the following: low birth weight, miscarriage, premature birth, or stillbirth.

Q fever with severe complications can end up in death.

Food items or nutrients that may prevent Q fever

The following foods or nutrients can help prevent Q fever and fight the bacteria that causes the infection:

  • Cabbage – Cabbage can help fight bacteria, especially H. Pylori bacteria that causes stomach ulcers. Additionally, cabbage can help detoxify the bladder, colon, and liver.
  • Fermented foods – Fermented foods have “healthy” bacteria that can boost gut health and fight unhealthy bacteria to strengthen immunity.
  • Ginger – Ginger has compounds that can inhibit the growth of and eliminate oral pathogens. It also has an antibacterial effect on respiratory and periodontal infections.
  • Honey – Honey has various medicinal purposes, and it is a potent antibacterial. Honey can help treat infections and antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
  • Onions and garlic – Both onions and garlic have powerful anti-bacterial properties. Onions and garlic have thiosulfinates, especially allicin, which is a potent antimicrobial that can prevent infections.

Treatments, management plans for Q fever

Treatment for Q fever will depend on the severity of a patient’s symptoms. Mild infections will often resolve after several weeks without any treatment.

However, more severe infections may require consultations with a healthcare professional who will prescribe the necessary medication (e.g., Doxycycline). Chronic Q fever will also require a consultation with a medical professional.

Where to learn more

Summary

Q fever refers to a bacterial infection caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii).

The side effects of Q fever usually include chest pain, fever, and headaches.

Complications linked to the disease may include encephalitis, endocarditis, and fatigue syndrome.

Cabbage, fermented foods, ginger, honey, and onions and garlic can help prevent Q fever and fight the bacteria that causes the infection.

Treatment for Q fever will depend on the severity of a patient’s symptoms. Mild infections will often resolve after several weeks without any treatment.

However, more severe infections may require consultations with a healthcare professional who will prescribe the necessary medication (e.g., Doxycycline). Chronic Q fever will also require a consultation with a medical professional.

Sources include

Healthline.com

CDC.gov

DoveMed.com

OrganicAuthority.com



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