Prolapse of the rectum – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Thursday, June 14, 2018 by

Prolapse of the rectum is a condition that occurs when the rectum falls and comes through the anal opening. Although the exact cause of the condition is unclear, there are several possible causes for it. These include a defect in the pelvic floor through which a hernia may slip down; loose muscles of the anal sphincter; an abnormally long colon; downward movement of the abdominal cavity between the rectum and uterus; prolapse of the small intestine; constipation; diarrhea; and chronic coughing and sneezing.

There are three types of prolapses of the rectum: full-thickness, mucosal, and internal. Full-thickness rectal prolapse, the most common type of rectal prolapse, occurs when the full thickness of the wall of the rectum sticks out through the anus. The protrusion can be partial or complete. In a partial prolapse, the inner lining of the rectum bulges partly from the anus; while the entire rectum bulges through the anus in a complete prolapse. In mucosal prolapse, only the mucosa or the lining of the mucosa sticks out through the anus; while in internal prolapse, the rectum folds in on itself but does not stick out through the anus.

Prolapse of the rectum most commonly occurs in children below six years old. Health complications such as cystic fibrosis, intestinal worm infections, long-term diarrhea, and other health problems present at birth may result in prolapse. A prolapse of the rectum can be partial or complete. In adults, on the other hand, prolapse of the rectum is usually found with constipation, or with a muscle or nerve problem in the pelvic or genital area.

Known side effects of prolapse of the rectum

The side effects of prolapse of the rectum include pain during bowel movements, mucus or bloody discharge from the protruding tissue, inability to control bowel movements, loss of urge to defecate (mostly with larger prolapses), and awareness of something protruding upon wiping. The prolapse may occur during bowel movements and retract afterward. Moreover, the protrusion may become more often and appear when the patient sneezes or coughs.

Prolapse of the rectum can also lead to other complications, such as damage to the rectum like ulceration and bleeding, incarceration, strangulation of the rectum wherein the blood supply is reduced, and death and decay of the strangulated part of the rectum.

Body systems harmed by prolapse of the rectum

The body system harmed by prolapse of the rectum are the digestive and excretory systems.

List of foods or nutrients that prevent prolapse of the rectum

Prolapse of the rectum can be prevented by eating foods rich in fiber, including fruits, vegetables, bran, and beans. It can also be prevented by eating less processed foods, drinking plenty of water, being physically active, and managing stress with meditation or other relaxation techniques.

Treatments, management plans for prolapse of the rectum

Treatment for prolapse of the rectum starts with steps to avoid constipation and straining. If the prolapse of the rectum is severe enough and affects the quality of life, surgery may be recommended. Management plans for prolapse of the rectum before or after recovery from surgery include avoiding any activities that increase pressure in the rectal area; treating persistent cough; stopping smoking; eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables daily; drinking six to eight glasses of water each day; and staying active and getting regular exercise.

Where to learn more

Summary

Prolapse of the rectum occurs when the rectum falls and comes through the anal opening.

Prolapse of the rectum causes pain during bowel movements, mucus or bloody discharge from the protruding tissue, inability to control bowel movements, loss of urge to defecate (mostly with larger prolapses), and awareness of something protruding upon wiping.

Prolapse of the rectum can be prevented by eating more foods rich in fiber and eating less processed foods.

Prolapse of the rectum can be treated by avoiding constipation and straining and surgery.

Sources include:

MedlinePlus.gov

MedicalNewsToday.com

EMedicineHealth.com

BetterHealth.VIC.gov.au

Healthline.com

URMC.Rochester.edu



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