Monocrotophos – toxicity, side effects, diseases and environmental impacts

Saturday, November 18, 2017 by

Monocrotophos is a highly toxic organophosphate insecticide that is reddish brown solid in appearance and has a mild ester odor. It is a broad spectrum insecticide, which makes it harmful to both pests and non-pest insects. It also has systemic and residual contact actions. It soluble in ethanol, acetone, and water, but practically insoluble in diesel oils and kerosene.

Monocrotophos has been discontinued from use in the U.S. but is still used internationally, particularly in Latin America.

Monocrotophos, also known as Crisodin, has the following synonyms: Apadrin, Azodrin, Biloborn, C1414, Crisodrin, Hazodrin, SO9129, Monocron, Nuvacron, Plantdrin and Pilladrin. Its molecular formula is C7H14NO5P.

List of known side effects

Contact or poisoning with organophosphorus compounds like monocrotophos can cause a number of adverse symptoms ranging from irritation to the eyes, blurred vision, rhinorrhea, breathing difficulty, tightness in the chest, wheezing, muscle twitching, respiratory depression, productive cough, fluid in lungs, muscle weakness, tremor, incoordination, excessive salivation, abdominal cramps, dizziness, headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and convulsions. In severe cases, monocrotophos can cause seizures, incontinence, respiratory depression and loss of consciousness.

Despite these side effects, monocrotophos is not classifiable as a human carcinogen.

Body systems affected by monocrotophos

Monocrotophos affects the central nervous system by inhibiting cholinesterase, which breaks down acetylcholine, a chemical that serves as neurotransmitters alongside other choline-based esters. Additionally, serious exposure may target the eyes, respiratory system, cardiovascular system and reproductive system.

Items that can contain monocrotophos

Based on an entry from the Pesticide Properties Database, some of the manufacturers and suppliers of products containing monocrotophos include:

  • BASF
  • AgroCare
  • King Tech Corp
  • United Phosphorus

Likewise, products with monocrotophos as an active ingredient include:

  • Nuvacron
  • Crisodrin
  • Monophos
  • Monodrin
  • Phoskill

How to avoid monocrotophos

Any chemical handling, mixing and application requires safety precautions. These include wearing safety glasses with side shields or splash proof goggles. DO NOT wear contact lenses as it may absorb irritants and all lenses concentrate them.

Wear protective overalls and footwear like safety rubber boots and chemical-resistant gloves. Make sure first-aid is readily accessible in the workplace.

Where to learn more

Summary

Monocrotophos is a highly toxic organophosphate insecticide used to control insect pests such as aphids, common mites, ticks, spiders, caterpillars.

This broad spectrum insecticide is a reddish brown solid and has a mild ester odor. It is applied to a wide range of crops, including cotton, palms, ornamental conifers, ornamental shrubs and flowers, peanuts, sugarcane, citrus and olives.

Monocrotophos has been discontinued from use in the U.S. but is still used internationally.

Monocrotophos poisoning may cause a number of adverse health effects such as eye injury, labored breathing, muscle weakness, tremor, incoordination, dizziness, headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramps (to name a few). In severe exposures, it may induce seizures, incontinence, respiratory depression and loss of consciousness.

Prolonged exposures to organophosphorus chemicals like monocrotophos may target several body systems, including the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, blood cholinesterase and reproductive system.

Sources include:

ToxiPedia.org

PesticideInfo.org

PubChem.NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov

CDC.gov

ExToxNet.ORST.edu

Sitem.Herts.ac.uk

DataSheets.SCBT.com



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