Melioidosis – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Monday, May 14, 2018 by

Melioidosis is an infectious disease of humans and animals caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, a motile Gram negative bacillus. This organism was formerly known as Pseudomonas pseudomallei.

It is endemic in Southeast Asia, Africa, Australia, the Middle East, India, and China. It is mainly associated with tropical and subtropical regions.

The bacteria enter the body through skin abrasions, burns, or wounds infected by contaminated soil; inhalation of dust; or by eating food contaminated with B. psudomallei. Melioidosis is sometimes called Whitmore’s disease.

Known side effects of melioidosis

The side effects of melioidosis vary depending on the type of the infection. For localized infection, pain, swelling, fever, ulcers, and abscess formation can occur. For pulmonary infection, high fever, chest pain, cough, headache, and anorexia or decreased appetite can occur. Headache, fever, respiratory problems, joint pains, abdominal discomfort, muscle tenderness, and disorientation can occur for bloodstream infection. Disseminated infection can cause weight loss, fever, muscle and joint pain, stomach pain, chest pain, headaches, and seizures. Melioidosis can also result in other health complications, such as skin ulcers, body organ abscesses, pneumonia, septicemia, and meningitis. If untreated, it can lead to death.

Body systems harmed by melioidosis

The body systems harmed by melioidosis are the immune, respiratory, cardiovascular, and digestive systems.

List of foods or nutrients that prevent melioidosis

There is no information on what foods or nutrients specifically prevent melioidosis. However, there are foods that prevent bacterial infections. These include aloe vera, turmeric, apple cider vinegar, garlic tea, cranberry juice, lemons, and probiotics, such as dark chocolate, sauerkraut, kefir, and kombucha.

Treatments, management plans for melioidosis

Treatments for melioidosis vary depending on the type of infection. Treatments may include intravenous microbial therapy and oral antibiotics. People who live in or are visiting areas where melioidosis is common should take these actions to prevent infection:

  • Avoid contact with soil and standing water if you have open wounds, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease.
  • Be alert about avoiding exposure by inhalation during severe weather events.
  • Get screened for melioidosis if you are about to start immunosuppressive therapy.
  • Healthcare workers should wear masks, gloves, and gowns.
  • Meat cutters and processors should wear gloves and regularly disinfect knives.
  • When working in soil or water, wear waterproof boots and gloves.

Where to learn more

Summary

Melioidosis is an infectious disease of humans and animals caused by a motile Gram negative bacillus called Burkholderia pseudomalle.

Melioidosis’ side effects vary depending on the type of infection — localized infection, pulmonary infection, bloodstream infection, and disseminated infection.

For localized infection, it causes pain, swelling, fever, ulcers, and abscess formation.

For pulmonary infection, it causes high fever, chest pain, cough, headache, and anorexia or decreased appetite.

For bloodstream infection, it causes headache, fever, respiratory problems, joint pains, abdominal discomfort, muscle tenderness, and disorientation.

For disseminated infection, it causes weight loss, fever, muscle and joint pain, stomach pain, chest pain, headaches, and seizures.

Melioidosis can lead to other complications, such as skin ulcers, body organ abscesses, pneumonia, septicemia, and meningitis.

Foods that prevent bacterial infections include aloe vera, turmeric, apple cider vinegar, garlic tea, cranberry juice, lemons, and probiotics, such as dark chocolate, sauerkraut, kefir, and kombucha.

Treatments for melioidosis may include intravenous microbial therapy and oral antibiotics.

Sources include:

NJ.gov

Medical-Dictionary.TheFreeDictionary.com

DoveMed.com

RightDiagnosis.com

StepToHealth.com

Healthline.com 1

Healthline.com 2



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