Marburg hemorrhagic fever – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Wednesday, May 30, 2018 by

Marburg hemorrhagic fever is a life-threatening hemorrhagic fever with a case fatality ratio of up to 88 percent. The Marburg virus, which causes the infection, was first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever coincided in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, Germany and in Belgrade, Yugoslavia (now Serbia). Marburg virus is a genetically unique animal-borne RNA virus of the filovirus family. Apart from Marburg virus, the other known members of the filovirus family are the five species of Ebola virus.

People who are at risk of developing the disease are those who are in close contact with African fruit bats, human patients, or non-human primates infected with Marburg virus. The risk of exposure can be greater for people who travel in endemic regions in Africa, including Uganda and other parts of central Africa, and have contact with fruit bats, or enter caves or mines occupied by fruit bats. Today, this disease is referred to as Marburg virus disease (MVD).

Known side effects of Marburg hemorrhagic fever

The side effects of Marburg hemorrhagic fever typically appear suddenly after an incubation period of about five to 10 days. Early symptoms include fever, chills, headache, and muscle aches. Other side effects include a rash on the chest, back, and stomach, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, sore throat, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Symptoms can continue and become severe. These include jaundice, pancreatic inflammation, severe weight loss, delirium, liver failure, and massive hemorrhaging with organ dysfunction.

Marburg hemorrhagic fever can cause other complications, such as multi-organ dysfunction, liver failure, pancreatitis, orchitis, hepatitis, transverse myelitis, uveitis, spinal cord inflammation, eye inflammation, parotid gland inflammation, and even death.

Body systems harmed by Marburg hemorrhagic fever

Marburg hemorrhagic fever harms multiple organs in the body.

List of foods or nutrients that prevent Marburg hemorrhagic fever

There is no information on what foods or nutrients prevent Marburg hemorrhagic fever. However, one way to protect against infection is to avoid fruit bats and sick non-human primates in central Africa.

Treatments, management plans for Marburg hemorrhagic fever

There is no specific treatment for Marburg hemorrhagic fever. Although supportive care, such as rehydration with oral or intravenous fluids, and treatment of specific symptoms improves survival.

Where to learn more

Summary

Marburg hemorrhagic fever is a disease caused by the Marburg virus with a case fatality ratio of up to 88 percent.

Marburg hemorrhagic fever initially causes fever, chills, headache, and muscle aches.

Marburg hemorrhagic fever also causes a rash on the chest, back, and stomach, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, sore throat, abdominal pain, and diarrhea.

Marburg hemorrhagic fever, as it worsens, causes jaundice, pancreatic inflammation, severe weight loss, delirium, liver failure, and massive hemorrhaging with organ dysfunction.

Marburg hemorrhagic can be prevented by avoiding fruit bats and sick non-human primates in central Africa.

Marburg hemorrhagic fever treatments include supportive care and treatments of specific symptoms.

Sources include:

MedicineNet.com 1

MedicineNet.com 2

CDC.gov 1

CDC.gov 2

CDC.gov 3

RightDiagnosis.com

WHO.int



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