Lymphoplasmacytic Sclerosing Pancreatitis – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Wednesday, July 25, 2018 by

Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LSP) targets a patient’s pancreas. The disease can also affect an individual’s bile ducts, kidneys, lymph nodes, and salivary glands.

LSP may occur when the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy body tissues, glands, and organs.

The condition has two types::

  • Type 1, or IgG4-related pancreatitis– Aside from the pancreas, this may affect various body organs and systems like the hepatic bile ducts, kidneys, lymph nodes, and salivary glands.
  • Type 2, or Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis – This specifically targets the pancreas, but at least 30 percent of patients with this type of LSP can also have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is also called autoimmune pancreatitis, idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis, and IgG4-related pancreatitis.

Known symptoms of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis

While lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis can be asymptomatic. However, when symptoms occur they can vary depending on the patient.

The symptoms of LSP may include:

  • Appetite loss
  • Dark colored urine
  • Jaundice
  • Lethargy/weakness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Pain in the upper abdomen or the middle of the back
  • Pale stools or stools that float and are difficult to flush
  • Unintentional weight loss

Risk factors for lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis are different for the two types.

Type 1:

  • Being male
  • Being older than 60

Type 2:

  • Having IBD
  • Being older than 40

Body systems harmed by lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis

Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis may cause complications like the malfunction of the pancreas. This can also result in the low production of enzymes and hormones.

The condition can cause other complications such as:

  • Diabetes
  • Metabolic bone disease
  • Mineral and vitamin deficiencies
  • Obstructive jaundice
  • Pancreatic stones

Food items or nutrients that may prevent lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis

Patients with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis must limit their alcohol consumption or avoid it altogether so their condition doesn’t worsen. Alcohol is linked to a higher risk of developing pancreatitis in both men and women.

Patients with LSP can also benefit from a low-fat diet. Gallstones, a major cause of acute pancreatitis, can develop when too much cholesterol accumulates in a patient’s bile. The liver produces bile to help digest fats. To reduce the risk of developing gallstones, eat a low-fat diet with a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables, along with whole grains.

To help prevent pancreatitis, avoid fatty or fried foods and full-fat dairy products. High triglyceride levels, or the amount of fats carried in the blood, may increase your risk of developing acute pancreatitis.

Minimize your consumption of foods full of simple sugars, like sugary desserts and high-calorie beverages, which can raise your triglyceride levels.

Treatments, management plans for lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis

Treatment for lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis can include:

  • Biliary stenting – This drains the bile ducts and relieves obstructive jaundice.
  • Insulin treatment – Recommended if diabetes is caused by insulin insufficiency.
  • Mineral and vitamin supplementation – Can help address deficiencies.

Where to learn more

Summary

Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LSP) targets a patient’s pancreas. The disease can also affect an individual’s bile ducts, kidneys, lymph nodes, and salivary glands.

The symptoms of LSP may include appetite loss, dark colored urine, jaundice, and lethargy/weakness.

The condition can cause complications such as diabetes, metabolic bone disease, mineral and vitamin deficiencies, and obstructive jaundice.

Patients with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis must limit their alcohol consumption or avoid it altogether so their condition doesn’t worsen. To reduce the risk of developing gallstones, eat a low-fat diet with a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables, along with whole grains.

Treatment for lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis can include biliary stenting, insulin treatment, and mineral and vitamin supplementation.

Sources include:

DoveMed.com

EverydayHealth.com



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