Hypermetropia – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 by

Also known as farsightedness, hypermetropia is a condition in which distant objects may be seen more clearly than objects that are near. However, people experience hypermetropia differently. Some people may not notice any problems with their vision, especially in children. For people with significant hypermetropia, their vision can be blurry for objects at any distance, whether near or far. The condition develops in eyes that focus images behind the retina rather than on the retina, which can lead to blurred vision. This happens when the eyeball is too short, which inhibits light from focusing on the retina. It may also be a result of the abnormal shape of the cornea or lens. Everyone can be affected by hypermetropia. In the U.S., approximately five to 10 percent of individuals are affected by the condition. People whose parents are farsighted may also be more at risk of getting the condition.

Known side effects of hypermetropia

Hypermetropia can cause several side effects, including a blurry vision for words or objects up close, squinting to see clearer and better, an aching or burning feeling around the eyes, and a headache after reading or other tasks that require a person to focus on something up close. Hypermetropia can also lead to other complications. If it remains undiagnosed and untreated in children, it can lead to strabismus or crossed eyes. If severe hypermetropia is present from a very young age, lazy eye or amblyopia can occur.

Body systems harmed by hypermetropia

The main body system harmed by hypermetropia is the ocular system as it is a condition that occurs in the eyes.

List of foods or nutrients that prevent hypermetropia

The foods that can help maintain a healthy retina and potentially prevent hypermetropia include dark leafy foods and bright-colored fruits and vegetables, such as spinach, kale, carrots, yams, and cantaloupes. Foods rich in omega-3s fatty acids, such as salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel, black currant seed oil, flaxseed oil, pistachios, walnuts, and almonds; vitamin C-rich foods, such as oranges, grapefruits, lemons, and berries; foods rich in bioflavonoids and zinc, such as kidney beans, black-eyed peas, and lentils; vitamin E-rich foods like sunflower seeds; eggs, whole grains, and beef are all good for the eyes.

Treatments, management plans for hypermetropia

There are some treatment options for hypermetropia. The most common treatment for the condition is the correction of the eyesight using glasses or contact lenses. Wearing a lens made to the patient’s prescription will ensure that light rays fall onto the retina so that the patient can focus on an object accurately. For contact lenses, there are two types available: rigid gas-permeable and soft. Lenses can be worn every day and discarded each day or disinfected and re-used, or worn for a longer period of time and kept in overnight. For wearing contact lenses, it important to maintain good lens hygiene to prevent eye infections. Hypermetropia can also be treated with surgical treatments, with laser surgery being the most reliable. Surgical treatments involve increasing the curve of the cornea to increase its focusing power. This is done by removing some tissue from the edge of the cornea.

Where to learn more

Summary

Hypermetropia is a condition wherein distant objects may be seen more clearly than objects that are near.

Hypermetropia causes blurry vision for words or objects up close, squinting to see clearer and better, an aching or burning feeling around the eyes, and a headache after reading or other tasks that require a person to focus on something up close.

Hypermetropia can lead to crossed eyes or lazy eye.

Hypermetropia can be prevented with the help of dark leafy foods and bright-colored fruits and vegetables, such as spinach, kale, carrots, yams, and cantaloupes.

Hypermetropia can be treated with glasses, contact lenses, or laser surgery.

Sources include:

NEI.NIH.gov

Healthline.com

Patient.info

AllAboutVision.com

MayoClinic.org

HSE.ie



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