Hashimoto’s thyroiditis – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Tuesday, April 10, 2018 by

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is an autoimmune disorder that can cause an underactive thyroid or hypothyroidism. The immune system of individuals with this disease attacks their thyroid, impairing tits function. This in turn results in the thyroid being unable to produce enough thyroid hormones. Alternative names for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis include Hashimoto’s disease, chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, or autoimmune thyroiditis.

The exact cause of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis remains unknown, however it is believed to be a result of a combination of genetic predisposition together with an environmental trigger, which induces the process of autoimmune destruction. People who are at risk of the disease include women, people with a family history of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis or other autoimmune disorders, those who have high levels of iodine in the body, and those exposed to radiation. In the U.S., Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism, and occurs in approximately five out of 100 people.

Known side effects of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis develops slowly over the years, and the level of thyroid hormones of its patients gradually decrease. A person with the disease may experience abnormal sensitivity to cold temperatures, an increase in blood cholesterol levels, constipation, difficulty concentrating, depression, dry skin, enlarged neck, swollen, puffed up face, general tiredness, prolonged menstruation, muscle pain, pale skin, stiffness in the hands and feet, hoarse voice, and sudden weight gain.

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis can also cause complications, such as heart problems, goiter, mental health problems, birth defects, and myxedema or severe hypothyroidism.

Body systems harmed by Hashimoto’s thyroiditis

The body systems harmed by Hashimoto’s thyroiditis include the endocrine and immune systems.

List of foods or nutrients that prevent Hashimoto’s thyroiditis

There is no information on what foods or nutrients can prevent Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, but there are foods and nutrients that can help treat the disease. These include iodine-rich foods, such as seafood, table salt, eggs, potatoes, and cow’s milk; selenium-rich foods, such as eggs, legumes like peanuts and soybeans, Brazil nuts, tuna and sardines, beef, and chicken; and zinc-rich foods, such as oysters, shellfish, beef, chicken, legumes like lentils and beans, and cow’s milk.

Treatments, management plans for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis

Treatment options for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis include medications and surgery, although not all patients of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis need treatment.

Where to learn more

Summary

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease that cause hypothyroidism.

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis causes decreased thyroid hormone levels, abnormal sensitivity to cold temperatures, an increase in blood cholesterol levels, constipation, difficulty concentrating, depression, dry skin, enlarged neck, swollen, puffed up face, general tiredness, prolonged menstruation, muscle pain, pale skin, stiffness in the hands and feet, hoarse voice, and sudden weight gain.

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis leads to other complications, including heart problems, goiter, mental health problems, birth defects, and myxedema or severe hypothyroidism.

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis affects the endocrine and immune systems.

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis’ treatment options are medications and surgery.

Sources include:

NIDDK.NIH.gov

EmedicineHealth.com

MedicalNewsToday.com

EverydayHealth.com

Healthline.com

Patient.info



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