Frontotemporal Dementia – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Wednesday, March 28, 2018 by

Frontotemporal dementia refers to several disorders that affect the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. Behavior, emotions, personality, and speech are controlled in these areas of the brain, and these disorders cause the brain to lose brain cell function.

Frontotemporal dementia is also known as frontal lobe dementia. It was formerly called Pick’s disease after Arnold Pick, the physician who first described the condition.

Frontotemporal dementia is divided into three categories:

  1. Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia — This affects personality and behavior.
  2. Primary progressive aphasia — This initially affects speech and then behavior.
  3. Progressive nonfluent aphasia — This results in individuals losing their ability to recall and speak words.

The type of frontotemporal dementia that a person is diagnosed with is determined by the most prominent symptoms.

An individual may develop more than one type of dementia and the condition is called mixed dementia.

Known side effects of frontotemporal dementia

The side effects of frontotemporal dementia depend on affected areas of the brain. Most side effects can be divided into two categories: behavior or language.

The common behavioral side effects of frontotemporal dementia include:

  • Apathy/a lack of interest in activities
  • Compulsive behavior
  • Inappropriate actions
  • Lack of inhibition or restraint
  • Neglect of personal hygiene

The common language-related side effects of frontotemporal dementia include:

  • Difficulty talking or understanding speech
  • Difficulty with social interactions
  • Language recall problems
  • Loss of reading and writing skills

Body systems harmed by frontotemporal dementia

Since frontotemporal dementia is not life-threatening, individuals with the condition may live with it for years. However, it can result in an increased risk for other illnesses that may be more severe.

Pneumonia is the most common cause of death among patients with frontotemporal dementia. Individuals are also at increased risk for infections and fall-related injuries.

As frontotemporal dementia progressively worsens, patients may engage in risky behavior or lose the ability to care for themselves. Patients may require 24-hour nursing care, or they may need to stay in an assisted living facility or nursing home.

Food items or nutrients that may prevent frontotemporal dementia

The following foods or nutrients can help prevent frontotemporal dementia:

  • Blueberries — Blueberries are rich in flavonoids that activate brain pathways linked to less cellular aging.
  • Cruciferous vegetables — Cruciferous vegetables include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and sprouts, which are full of vitamin K and glucosinolates that have an antioxidant effect.
  • Fish — All types of fish have iodine and iron which can help maintain cognitive function. Fattier fish like salmon and trout are also full of omega-3 fatty acids that are good for the brain
  • Nuts — Unsalted nuts have antioxidants and healthy fats.
  • Olive oil — Olive oil has antioxidants, monounsaturated fats, and vitamin E. Use it as your main cooking oil and salad dressing.
  • Poultry — Poultry is a good substitute for red or processed meat.

Treatments, management plans for frontotemporal dementia

While frontotemporal dementia in incurable, treatment is focused on managing and alleviating its side effects.

Common treatments for the condition include:

  • Medications — Some antidepressants may help minimize behavioral problems that are caused by changes to the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. Antipsychotic medications can also help address behavioral problems.
  • Speech therapy — Speech therapy can help patients learn to deal with speech difficulties. A speech therapist can also help individuals with frontotemporal dementia find other ways to communicate.

Where to learn more

Summary

Frontotemporal dementia refers to several disorders that affect the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. Behavior, emotions, personality, and speech are controlled in these areas of the brain, and these disorders cause the brain to lose brain cell function.

The side effects of frontotemporal dementia depend on affected areas of the brain. Most side effects can be divided into two categories: behavior or language.

Since frontotemporal dementia is not life-threatening, individuals with the condition may live with it for years. However, it can result in an increased risk for other illnesses that may be more severe.

Pneumonia is the most common cause of death among patients with frontotemporal dementia. Individuals are also at increased risk for infections and fall-related injuries.

Foods like blueberries, cruciferous vegetables, fish, nuts, olive oil, and poultry can help prevent frontotemporal dementia.

While frontotemporal dementia in incurable, treatment is focused on managing and alleviating its side effects.

Common treatments for the condition include medications and speech therapy.

Sources include:

Healthline.com

HopkinsMedicine.org

Chatelaine.com



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