Fabrazyme – uses, health risks, and side effects at NaturalPedia.com

Wednesday, September 05, 2018 by

Fabrazyme (generic name: agalsidase beta) is an artificial form of the naturally-occurring alpha-galactosidase A enzyme. This drug is used to treat Fabry disease, a deficiency of the alpha-galactosidase A enzyme. It works by lowering stores of globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) in the kidneys and certain other cells in the body. Fabrazyme is administered into a vein through an intravenous injection, typically given once every two weeks.

This drug may be harmful to people with heart problems and those who are allergic to Fabrazme or have antibodies to the medication. Fabrazyme may also interact with other drugs, such as prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

Known side effects of Fabrazyme

Taking Fabrazyme can cause an allergic reaction to some people. Get immediate medical assistance if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction:

  • Difficulty swallowing, chest discomfort, trouble breathing, feeling light-headed
  • Skin rash, hives, flushing – warmth, redness, or tingly feeling
  • Swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat

Most people using Fabrazyme develop antibodies to agalsidase beta and many will develop symptoms of an infusion reaction (side effects that develop during the injection). Watch out any of these signs of an infusion reaction and immediately ask for medical help:

  • A light-headed feeling, like you might pass out
  • Chest pain, fast or slow heart rate, feeling short of breath
  • Fever, headache, chills, stuffy nose, muscle pain, back pain, dizziness, drowsiness, tired feeling
  • Nausea, vomiting, tight feeling in your throat, stomach pain, diarrhea
  • Pale skin, feeling hot or cold, itching, numbness or tingly feeling, swelling in your hands or feet

Body systems that may be harmed by Fabrazyme

The body systems that may be harmed by Fabrazyme include the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, integumentary, immune, nervous, musculoskeletal, and nervous systems.

Food items or nutrients that may prevent side effects of Fabrazyme

The following food items can help treat and prevent chills, one of the side effects of Fabrazyme:

  • Chicken soup: Chicken soup can help with chills, flu, and other respiratory tract infections.
  • Herbal tea: Herbal tea with a teaspoon of honey can be therapeutic for the chills.
  • Lemon and hot water: Combining lemon, honey, half a teaspoon of grated ginger, and hot water can help with chills. Lemon and ginger contain antioxidant properties and are commonly used for medicinal purposes.
  • Warm foods: In traditional Chinese medicine, consuming warm foods is often recommended, highlighting the internal warming effect of food instead of the actual temperature of food.

Treatments, management plans for side effects of Fabrazyme

The following are some of the natural treatments for some of the side effects of Fabrazyme:

  • Dizziness, one of the side effects of Fabrazyme, can be treated by drinking water; incorporating fresh or ground ginger into diet, drinking ginger, or taking it in supplement form; eating foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, grapefruits, strawberries, and bell peppers; eating vitamin E-rich foods, including wheat germ, seeds, nuts, kiwis, and spinach; eating foods rich in vitamin B6, such as pistachios, tuna, turkey, lean pork, prunes, and apricots; or consuming iron-rich foods, such as red meat, poultry, beans, and dark leafy greens.
  • Fever, another side effect of Fabrazyme, can be treated naturally by consuming basil, ginger, garlic, cilantro leaves, grapes, or apple cider vinegar.

Where to learn more

Summary

Fabrazyme (generic name: agalsidase beta) is an artificial form of the naturally-occurring alpha-galactosidase A enzyme.

Fabrazyme is used to treat Fabry disease.

Fabrazyme can cause an allergic reaction and an infusion reaction.

Fabrazyme harms the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, integumentary, immune, nervous, musculoskeletal, and nervous systems.

Sources include:

Drugs.com 1

Drugs.com 2

EverydayHealth.com

Home-Remedies-For-You.com

Healthline.com

Food.NDTV.com



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