Beeswax – sources, health benefits, nutrients, uses and constituents at NaturalPedia.com

Tuesday, October 17, 2017 by

Beeswax is often confused with bee pollen and honey – they are very similar structurally and are all produced by bees. It does not provide any benefits to the body when it is directly consumed as it is inert or chemically inactive, but its other applications can provide immediate benefits.

Bees make beeswax in the glands inside their abdomens. They then scrape the beeswax from their bodies, chew and mix it with saliva and other enzymes, and place it in the honeycomb, where pollen is stored. Beeswax helps protect the honeycomb from infections and other unwanted pollutants.

Beeswax usually comes from bees of the genus Apis dorsata, Apis indica, Apis florea, Apis cerana, and Apis mellifera. It is usually colored yellow, red, orange, white, or brown. Its melting point ranges between 62 and 64 degrees Celsius. When it is heated above 85 degrees Celsius, it changes color.

List of known nutrients

  • Esters
  • Fatty Acids
  • Free Acids
  • Free Alcohols
  • Hydrocarbons
  • Hydroxypalmitate
  • Long-chain Alcohols
  • Oleate Esters
  • Palmitate
  • Palmitoleate
  • 3-Hydroxyflavone

Medicinal uses for beeswax

Beeswax is good for the skin. It serves as treatment for minor burns or other types of skin damage. According to the Bastyr Center for Natural Health in Seattle, Washington, beeswax can be incorporated in honey and olive oil to manufacture balms and lotions that may be used to treat eczema and psoriasis.

Beeswax has non-allergenic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. By being a natural moisturizer, it can be mixed into ingredients to make lip and skin balms. It can also serve as treatment for hemorrhoids and anal fissures.

Beeswax is a good source of roughage, a type of fiber that provides for the proper transport of food and waste products through the gut.

Beeswax is good for the hair. It stimulates the growth of hair follicles and is considered a good thickening agent, adding volume to your hair while keeping it soft, manageable, and protected against environmental damage. As such, it is a common ingredient in most hair care products like emulsifiers, balms, conditioners, pomades, shampoos, and products for hair repair. It also strengthens the scalp.

Beeswax is also said to have cholesterol-lowering, antibacterial, anti-fungal, and antiseptic properties.

Body systems supported by beeswax

Beeswax is good for the nervous system. It helps in making symptoms of depression and insomnia disappear.

Ways to use beeswax

Beeswax is used to preserve, package, and process some food products. It acts as a guard against the effects of acids in foods, thereby ensuring that foods are safe for consumption. It also has uses in the cosmetics industry, and is highly utilized for topical applications and commercial products like candles.

Candles that are made from beeswax produce negative ions that eliminate dander, dust particles, pollen, and other allergens, making them an essential staple in the homes of patients with hay fever and asthma.

Beeswax, controversially, is also said to be an ingredient in some birth control pills.

Where to learn more

Summary

Bees make beeswax in the glands inside their abdomens.

Beeswax is good for the skin. It serves as treatment for minor burns or other types of skin damage.

Beeswax has non-allergenic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties.

Sources include:

LiveStrong.com

DietHealthClub.com

FoodsForLiving.com



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