Arabinogalactan sources, health risks

Friday, October 13, 2017 by

Arabinogalactan is a starch-like chemical that can be found in various plants, but it is mainly found in Larch trees. Most of the arabinogalactan sold in the market is produced from Western Larch. It belongs to a group of carbohydrates known as polysaccharides. It consists of chains of arabinose and galactose monossacharides. It can be either consumed through food diet or prebiotic supplements. It is found in the cell walls of plants and bacteria and in pollen from mugwort and ragweed which causes allergies.

There are a lot of names that arabinogalactan can be identified with, these include: Abies gmelinii, AG, Ara-6, Arabinogalactan de Alerce, Arabinogalactan, Arabinogalactane, Arabinogalactane de Meleze, Arabinogalactane de Mélèze, Arabinogalactin, Arabinogalactine, Gmelinii, Gomme de Mélèze, Larch, Larch Gum, Larch Tree, Larix, Larix dahurica, Larix decidua, Larix europaea, Larix gmelinii, Larix occidentalis, Lch, Mélèze, Mélèze d’Europe, Mongolian Larch, Mongolian Larchwood, Pinus Larix, Soluble Fiber, Stractan, Western Larch, Western Larch Arabinogalactan, Wood Gum, and Wood Sug.

Harmful effects that can be caused by arabinogalactan

Although arabinogalactan is approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States, it still has several potential hazardous effects.

Arabinogalactan is a part of mycobacteria cell walls, which includes pathogens that are known to cause serious diseases, such as tuberculosis. Since there may be various arabinogalactan receptors between what the mycobacteria and what we ingest, it is advised that those with mycobacteria infections should avoid consuming arabinogalactans until more studies are conducted.

Yeast overgrowth and negative reactions towards arabinogalactans may be present because yeast can ferment arabinose. Thus, if you have these two reactions, it is recommended to eliminate the amount of the prebiotic you ingest.

A study also suggested that if more arabinogalactan is consumed, there is a higher chance of developing fermentation side effects, such as bloating and flatulence.

Even though there are reports about the health benefits of arabinogalactan, there is not enough evidence to prove these beneficial effects. There is insufficient evidence for its effectiveness in pneumonia, flu, liver disease, inflammation, and boosting the immune system.

Body systems harmed by arabinogalactan

Information about the body systems and organs that arabinogalactan can harm is limited. One of these few side effects is that it harms the digestive system. This substance can cause bloating and abdominal discomfort in people with existing digestive disorders. People who eat a high-fiber or a low-galactose diet should refrain from consuming arabinogalactan.

The immune system may also be at risk if arabinogalactan is consumed. This harmful effect is particular to those who suffer from immune disorders. It might cause the immune system to be more active, which will result to an increase in the symptoms of auto-immune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Arabinogalactan may also reduce blood sugar levels. Thus, the substance is considered harmful to people with diabetes or low blood sugar, and those who take drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect the blood sugar levels.

In addition, arabinogalactan is not recommended for pregnant or breastfeeding women because there is no sufficient evidence that will prove its health benefits. It may also be harmful to organ transplant recipients, because it may increase the risk of organ transplant rejection. So, it is best to avoid using arabinogalactan if you have gone under organ transplant surgeries.

Where to learn more

Summary

Arabinogalactan is a starch-like chemical that can be found in mainly in Larch trees. Most of the arabinogalactan sold in the market is produced from Western Larch. This substance belongs to a group of carbohydrates known as polysaccharides. It consists of chains of arabinose and galactose monossacharides. Consumption of arabinogalactan can be either through food or prebiotic supplements. Although approved by the FDA, it has several harmful effects which include bloating and flatulence. It may also be harmful to pregnant and lactating women and those who have undergone organ transplant.

Sources include:

Medicine.net

FixYourGut.com

TheSourceNatural.com



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