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Quotes about Salt from the world's top natural health / natural living authors

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"If you still miss salt, try adding a little Bragg Liquid Aminos (available in health food stores), South River Sweet White Miso, or low-sodium tamari. Try to limit sodium consumption to less than 2,000 mg a day. Your choices are easier when you know the salt content of various seasonings. Some useful comparisons: • Sea salt, 1 teaspoon: 2,360 mg sodium • Low-sodium tamari, 1 teaspoon: 700 mg sodium • Bragg Liquid Aminos, 1 teaspoon: 233 mg sodium • South River Sweet White Miso, 1 teaspoon: 115 mg sodium It is helpful to keep breakfast and lunch simple—and nearly the same every day."
- Caldwell B. Esselstyn, Jr., M.D., Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease (Get the book.)

"If you want to make saltwater nose drops at home, simply mix l/4 teaspoon of salt in 8 ounces of warm water. Because no preservatives are added, saltwater nose drops made at home should be made daily. Pharmacies also carry saltwater nose drops under brand names such as Ayr Saline Nasal Drops or Mist, Pediamist, or NaSal Nasal Drops or Spray. To use saltwater nose drops, draw a small quantity of saltwater into a bulb aspirator and, while holding the child's head slightly back, gently squirt the fluid into each of the child's nostrils. (Bulb aspirators can be purchased at most pharmacies."
- Paul A. Offit, M.D.m Bonnie Fass-Offit, M.D. and Louis M. Bell, M.D., Breaking the Antibiotic Habit: A Parent's Guide to Coughs, Colds, Ear Infections, and Sore Throats (Get the book.)

"If you miss salt, try vinegar, lemon, pepper, Mrs. Dash (in a variety of blends), Tabasco, or other hot sauces. If you still miss salt, try adding a little Bragg Liquid Aminos (available in health food stores), South River Sweet White Miso, or low-sodium tamari. Try to limit sodium consumption to less than 2,000 mg a day. Your choices are easier when you know the salt content of various seasonings."
- Caldwell B. Esselstyn, Jr., M.D., Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease (Get the book.)

"Millions of people have used warm salt water rinses to cure oral abscesses, gum boils, etc. Apparently, the warm salt water helps to draw excessive toxic fluid out of the gum tissue, thereby reducing swelling, alleviating pain, and killing harmful bacteria. This allows the gums to heal and keep the teeth healthy, too. If used in an irrigating device, the warm salt water reaches all gum line crevices and periodontal pockets, which is important for complete reversal of gum disease and tooth decay."
- Andreas Moritz, Cancer Is Not A Disease - It's A Survival Mechanism (Get the book.)

"At first, you'll think they taste boring, but that's only because you're a salt addict. Over time, your taste will adapt, and you'll begin to enjoy unsalted, natural foods. All the common grocery store foods like snack chips, soups, seasoned fish and many others are made with far too much salt in my opinion. Check the sodium content on the labels, and boycott any grocery item delivering more than 25% of the Recommended Daily Allowance of sodium per serving. Also, watch out for salt in restaurant foods."
- Mike Adams, Natural Health Solutions (Get the book.)

"Try carrying a small package of unrefined salt with you when going to a restaurant. Meal Ideas Refined salt should be avoided in the diet whenever possible and never intentionally added to foods. There are plenty of alternatives for seasoning and improving the taste of foods. Unrefined salt will bring out the natural flavors in your recipes."
- M.D. David Brownstein, The Guide to Healthy Eating (Get the book.)

"The Sodium Factor When it comes to diets, here is the real skinny on salt. Sodium is a mineral used by your body to regulate fluid balance, contraction of muscles and nerve impulses. It is measured in milligrams (mg). Table salt is 40 percent sodium (Na+), and one teaspoon of table salt contains 2,300 mg of sodium. The National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences recommends an approximate daily range of 1,100 to 3,300 mg of sodium for adults. For people with high blood pressure, hypertension experts are recommending no more than 2,300 mg of sodium a day."
- Craig Pepin-Donat, The Big Fat Health and Fitness Lie (Get the book.)

"They found that tomatoes with the ability to tolerate the most salt in their tissues were the worst at stopping salt from entering their systems, while tomatoes bad at tolerating salt had the best methods of keeping it out. So they crossbred the two kinds. The results were tomatoes that were both good at preventing salt from entering their systems and good at tolerating salt should it pass their natural barrier. Researchers are also looking for the genes that help a plant survive when it is under stress."
- Peter Pringle, Food, Inc. Mendel to Monsanto - The Promises and Perils of the Biotech Harvest (Get the book.)

"If used in an irrigating device, the warm salt water reaches all gum line crevices and periodontal pockets, which is important for complete reversal of gum disease and tooth decay. Rinsing or irrigating the mouth with salt water several times a day is usually enough to prevent and reverse gum disease. For situations of advanced gum disease, however, you may also use Sanguinary, an herbal extract, which has been used as a mouth rinse for centuries by native cultures."
- Andreas Moritz, Cancer Is Not A Disease - It's A Survival Mechanism (Get the book.)

"MODIFIED WALDORF SALAD Serves 2 Vi cup low-fat plain yogurt Vi teaspoon vanilla extract Vi teaspoon salt Vi teaspoon black pepper 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 red apple, cubed Vi cup celery, diced Vi cup grapes, halved Vi cup raisins Vi cup chopped walnuts Lettuce In a small bowl, mix together the yogurt, vanilla, salt, pepper, and lemon juice. Add the remaining ingredients except for the lettuce. Mix well and serve on lettuce leaves."
- Steven V. Joyal, What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Diabetes: An Innovative Program to Prevent, Treat, and Beat This Controllable Disease (Get the book.)

"They found that tomatoes with the ability to tolerate the most salt in their tissues were the worst at stopping salt from entering their systems, while tomatoes bad at tolerating salt had the best methods of keeping it out. So they crossbred the two kinds. The results were tomatoes that were both good at preventing salt from entering their systems and good at tolerating salt should it pass their natural barrier. Researchers are also looking for the genes that help a plant survive when it is under stress."
- Peter Pringle, Food, Inc. Mendel to Monsanto - The Promises and Perils of the Biotech Harvest (Get the book.)

"Season with salt and pepper if desired. SEITAN STEW Serves 4 1 large onion, chopped 2 carrots, diced 3 small turnips, peeled and cut into quarters 3 small yams, cut in half Vi pound mushrooms, halved 3 dried tomatoes, powdered 1 cup vegetable broth 1 tablespoon olive oil 8 ounces seitan, cut into chunks 1 teaspoon each: dried rosemary, dried thyme, dried sage 1 tablespoon miso 1-2 tablespoons arrowroot lA cup water Salt and pepper, to taste Steam the onion, carrots, turnips, and yams until the vegetables begin to soften. Transfer the vegetables to a skillet."
- Steven V. Joyal, What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Diabetes: An Innovative Program to Prevent, Treat, and Beat This Controllable Disease (Get the book.)

"Salt Don't worry about salt unless you have been told to do so by your doctor. Limiting salt will not help you truly lose weight. Avoiding salt may keep your body from holding in water, but weight loss from this is temporary. Talk to your doctor if you think you are having trouble with fluid retention. There is some recent evidence that suggests too much sodium may increase osteoporosis, or bone thinning, in postmenopausal women. If you are in this category, it may be wise to avoid foods that are high in sodium such as table salt, soy and Worcestershire sauce, and highly processed foods."
- Cheryle R. Hart, M.D. Mary Kay Grossman, R.D., The Insulin-Resistance Diet : How to Turn Off Your Body's Fat-Making Machine (Get the book.)

"Salinity fluctuates with the climate: in sequences of wet years, more fresh water ends up in the lake and salt levels go down. The converse is also true: in dry years, more water evaporates, leaving a more concentrated salty brine behind. Canadian scientists have now reconstructed long-term records of Moon Lake's saltiness by sampling the remains of tiny algae called diatoms - whose type and number fluctuate with salinity levels - from old lake sediments."
- Mark Lynas, Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet (Get the book.)

"The first thing bacteria resting on our food do when surrounded by salt descended from above is open nozzles in their body walls and sluice in plenty of water to try to dilute the stinging salt. On the plate of a delicate eater, who only lightly salts his food, the nozzles will soon close and the process will end there. But on the plate of a wild salt-pourer, eye on the next serving even as he still holds the salt shaker upside down over his plate, the bacteria will have to keep on sluicing."
- David Bodanis, The Secret House : The Extraordinary Science of an Ordinary Day (Get the book.)

"The two most popular seasonings are salt and sugar—and for a very good reason: the tip of the tongue is covered with taste buds that are sensitive to and satisfied by the flavors of salt and sugar. Nature designed us to desire sweet-tasting carbohydrates, because these foods are the richest in nutrition and energy. In order to most fully enjoy salt and sugar—and avoid damaging your health from overuse—sprinkle these two condiments on the surface of food, where your tongue can easily contact them."
- John A. McDougall, Dr. McDougall's Digestive Tune-Up (Get the book.)

"A little salt on your peas or tomatoes can be good," Dr. Bailey said. "But a lot of salt can have adverse health effects on your blood pressure, and too much can be fatal."24 Unfortunately, mixtures of chemicals with various toxic properties become more complicated than salt. A little bit of hormone-disrupting chemicals mixed with carcinogenic contaminants in the baby shampoo, the bubble bath and the body wash add up — day in and day out. The cosmetics companies insist their products are safe, but what do those claims really mean?"
- Stacy Malkan, Not Just a Pretty Face: The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry (Get the book.)

"Bile salt hydrolase in probiotics reduces the cholesterol reabsorption in the gut. • Bifidobacteria contain bile salt hydrolase as do some Lactobacilli species. • Probiotics may help your heart by lowering blood pressure. 1 1 I 1 I i i Heart disease is the number one killer in Western society. There are many factors that contribute to heart disease including stress, lack of exercise, diet and cholesterol. In fact, there are over 286 risk factors for heart disease. Gender, age and weight are all factors. However, the one that strikes the greatest fear in us is cholesterol."
- Allison Tannis, Probiotic Rescue: How You can use Probiotics to Fight Cholesterol, Cancer, Superbugs, Digestive Complaints and More (Get the book.)

"Bread, salt, and Iodine Deficiency Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of thyroid problems worldwide, and there is growing concern about iodine deficiency in the United States. It all has to do with bread and salt. Iodine is a major component of thyroid hormones. We need at least 150 meg per day (200 to 250 meg/day if pregnant or breast-feeding). Iodine deficiency, in addition to making us grow cranky and cold with goiters (enlarged thyroid glands), lowers thyroid hormone levels."
- Phuli Cohan, The Natural Hormone Makeover: 10 Steps to Rejuvenate Your Health and Rediscover Your Inner Glow (Get the book.)

"Salt is another illustration of this. salt derived from the earth or the sea is often added to food during processing; salt is rarely consumed in its alternative form—plants. Yet, that is a much better way to get sodium in your diet: Let the plant draw and assimilate it and other minerals from the soil or sea, doing most of the work for you. My favorite source of sodium is raw dulse. A sea vegetable, dulse is exceptionally healthy, offering a plethora of minerals that help prolong hydration and therefore endurance."
- Brendan Brazier, The Thrive Diet: The Whole Food Way to Lose Weight, Reduce Stress, and Stay Healthy for Life (Get the book.)

"Again, the more work the body must do to assimilate nutrients, the less usable energy it will be left with. salt is another illustration of this. salt derived from the earth or the sea is often added to food during processing; salt is rarely consumed in its alternative form—plants. Yet, that is a much better way to get sodium in your diet: Let the plant draw and assimilate it and other minerals from the soil or sea, doing most of the work for you. My favorite source of sodium is raw dulse."

- Brendan Brazier, The Thrive Diet: The Whole Food Way to Lose Weight, Reduce Stress, and Stay Healthy for Life (Get the book.)

"I recommend showering at least twice daily during a cleansing regimen and taking at least one hot bath in Epsom salt, or a detoxifying bath composed of hydrogen peroxide and sea salt. Dry skin-brushing is also very helpful, as are saunas, steam baths, or soaking in hot mineral water. Detoxifying Baths • Epsom salt: add 1-2 cups per tub full of warm water; soak up to 20 minutes. • Peroxide and Sea Salt: add 1 quart of 3 percent hydrogen peroxide and 1/2 teaspoon of sea salt to a tub full of warm water; soak for 20 minutes."
- J. E. Williams, Viral Immunity: A 10-Step Plan to Enhance Your Immunity against Viral Disease Using Natural Medicines (Get the book.)

"Your choices are easier when you know the salt content of various seasonings. Some useful comparisons: • Sea salt, 1 teaspoon: 2,360 mg sodium • Low-sodium tamari, 1 teaspoon: 700 mg sodium • Bragg Liquid Aminos, 1 teaspoon: 233 mg sodium • South River Sweet White Miso, 1 teaspoon: 115 mg sodium It is helpful to keep breakfast and lunch simple—and nearly the same every day. Specific recipes follow in the chapters ahead, but there are lots of useful ways to think about putting them together."
- Caldwell B. Esselstyn, Jr., M.D., Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease (Get the book.)

"Food Irradiation, salt, Coffee, Fluoride According to the American Cancer Society, there is no evidence that irradiation of foods, dietary salt, coffee, or fluoride increase cancer risk. Irradiation of foods is used to kill harmful bacteria and does not remain in foods after treatment. There is little evidence that moderate amounts of salt or salt-preserved foods affect cancer risk. However, some evidence suggests that diets containing large amounts of foods preserved by salting and pickling may be related to an increased risk for cancers of the stomach, nose, and throat."
- Richard Harkness, The Natural Pharmacist: Your Complete Guide to Reducing Cancer Risk (Get the book.)

"The other container of salt water, which had not been exposed to the healer, would hold the remainder of seeds. After the seeds were soaked in the two containers of salt water, the batch exposed to the water treated by the healer grew taller than the other batch. Grad then hypothesized that the reverse might also happen - negative feelings might have a negative effect on the growth of plants. In a follow-up study Grad had several psychiatric patients hold containers of ordinary water which were to be used again to sprout seeds."
- Lynne Mctaggart, The Field - The Quest for the Secret Force of the Universe (Get the book.)

"The results came back showing Dawes had low levels of salt in her blood and high levels of potassium. Lenzer immediately suspected Addison's disease. A relatively rare condition that is found in about one in one hundred thousand people, Addison's is nonetheless one of the first diagnoses a young doctor commits to memory. It occurs when the adrenal glands don't produce Cortisol, a hormone that's critical for the body's ability to maintain everything from blood pressure and salt-potassium balance to appetite and a sense of well-being."
- Shannon Brownlee, Overtreated: Why Too Much Medicine Is Making Us Sicker and Poorer (Get the book.)

"If your blood pressure is too high, for instance, perhaps limiting the salt in your diet would bring it back down. Don't take any drug before you know all the risks. Get a copy of the drug's label. The pharmaceutical companies write this document in language that even most doctors can't understand, but it contains all the information the FDA believes is needed to use the drug safely. The label lists all the known risks of the drug, and the drug companies use it to escape legal liability."
- Melody Petersen, Our Daily Meds: How the Pharmaceutical Companies Transformed Themselves into Slick Marketing Machines and Hooked the Nation on Prescription Drugs (Get the book.)

"Sodium and salt is associated with high blood pressure. It's one thing to put the salt shaker away, and avoid the obvious salty foods, such as potato chips and salted peanuts. But there are many food in your diet which you probably thought were — without question — safe and healthy. What about, for example, a bowl of cereal with milk? A good choice for someone with high blood pressure? No! Especially if the cereal is Cherrios, which has a sodium content higher than many snack foods, including potato chips! Even the milk itself has a high level of natural sodium."
- American Medical Publishing, Prescription Medicines, Side Effects and Natural Alternatives (Get the book.)

"Excessive salt intake causes kidney stress, once again deregulating the body's natural alkaline-to-acid balance. salt also disturbs digestion, and has been linked to stomach cancer. Salt cravings, typified by potato chip binges and a lust for nuts, make up some of the most common food swings. Even though the human body can get the necessary amount of salt naturally, by eating fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and beans, 50 percent to as high as 80 percent of sodium in the average American diet comes from adding it to food while cooking."
- Barnet Meltzer, M.D., Food Swings: Make the Life-Changing Connection Between the Foods You Eat and Your Emotional Health and Well-Being (Get the book.)

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