Fennel Seeds – sources, health benefits, nutrients, uses and constituents at NaturalPedia.com

Friday, June 30, 2017 by

Fennel seeds, which taste like anise or licorice, come from the plant fennel, which is an herb that originated from countries that are near the edge of the Mediterranean Sea. Aside from resembling the taste of anise, fennel seeds also look like anise seeds. They are both oblong in shape, are about three to four millimeters long, and are colored light brown with vertical stripes over their surface.

In some parts of the Mediterranean region, the bulb, aside from the seeds, is also eaten.

List of known nutrients

  • Anethole
  • Anisic aldehyde
  • Beta-Carotene
  • Chavicol
  • Cineole
  • Copper
  • Fenchone
  • Kaempferol
  • Limonene
  • Myrcene
  • Niacin
  • Pinene
  • Potassium
  • Pyridoxine
  • Quercetin
  • Riboflavin
  • Selenium
  • Thiamin
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B1
  • Vitamin B2
  • Vitamin B3
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin E
  • Zinc

Medicinal uses for fennel seeds

A study done in Iran showed that women who took a combination of fennel extract and vitamin E experienced a respite from menstrual cramps. The study also concluded that this concoction is much more effective than over-the-counter pills for menstrual pain.

Fennel can also be used as a topical agent when it comes to healing wounds, poisonous bites, or ingested poison. It also soothes inflammation and skin irritation.

Fennel seeds are rich in flavonoid antioxidants such as kaempferol and quercetin that remove harmful free radicals from the body and thus protect against aging, certain cancers, degenerative neurological disorders, and infection.

Other antioxidants present in fennel seeds are limonene, pinene, cineole, anethole, anisic aldehyde, myrcene, fenchone, and chavicol, all of which have digestive, carminative, and anti-flatulent properties.

Aside from antioxidants, fennel seeds are also a powerhouse of nutrients that include vitamins A, E, and C, as well as beta-carotene, and B-complex vitamins that include thiamin, pyridoxine, riboflavin, and niacin.

Fennel seeds contain dietary fiber; 100 grams of fennel seeds give 39.8 g of fiber. This contributes to the increase of the bulk of food throughout the digestive system and thus help in the prevention of constipation. Dietary fibers also decrease the re-absorption of bile salts in the colon, and thus reduces the risks of heart diseases.

The essential oils in fennel juice improves the absorption of nutrients. Fennel juice also acts as an antacid, and contributes to the proper operation of the digestive tract, for the occurrence of regular bowel movements. It also eliminates the presence of bad bacteria in the gut.

Cineole, which was mentioned earlier as one of the antioxidants that are contained in fennel seeds, alleviates the symptoms of asthma, congestion, and bronchitis. Potassium, which is found in fennel bulbs, improve memory and concentration.

Copper, which is responsible for the increase of red blood cells in the body, can also be found in fennel seeds.

Body systems supported by fennel seeds

Researchers in Italy said the ingestion of fennel seed oil can eradicate the presence of mucus in your lungs, relieve your cough, and soothe your sore throat. Some doctors recommend gargling once a day with five to seven grams (between one and one and a half teaspoons) of fennel seed to ease your symptoms.

Fennel juice also stimulates the release of endorphins into the bloodstream, thereby alleviating symptoms of depression. Also, essential oils of fennel, give instant relief form spasms, which are contractions of the intestines, organs, respiratory tract, muscles, and nerves, and are usually a sign of something wrong in these systems.

The fennel bulb, for its part, resolves the problem of acidity in the duodenum and eases the process of absorption.

Ways to use fennel seeds

Fennel seeds, which are savory in taste, can be used a s acondiment or as a flavoring base. For instance, in India, it is mixed in and becomes part of curry powder. Fennel seeds are also used as a condiment in Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Where to learn more

Summary

Fennel can be used as a topical agent when it comes to healing wounds, poisonous bites, or ingested poison.

Fennel seeds are rich in flavonoid antioxidants such as kaempferol and quercetin that remove harmful free radicals from the body.

The essential oils in fennel juice improves the absorption of nutrients.

Cineole, which was mentioned earlier as one of the antioxidants that are contained in fennel seeds, alleviates the symptoms of asthma, congestion, and bronchitis.

Copper, which is responsible for the increase of red blood cells in the body, can also be found in fennel seeds.

Sources include:

HealthLine.com

StyleCraze.com

Nutrition-And-You.com

 

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