Chokeberries – sources, health benefits, nutrients, uses and constituents at NaturalPedia.com

Thursday, July 06, 2017 by

Chokeberries are small, sub-arctic berries belonging to the Rosaceae family of flowering plants. The name “chokeberry” refers to the tart flavor of the berries, and the mouth pucker that results from eating them. There are over a dozen chokeberry species, but the most widely cultivated and commonly seen varieties are the slightly bitter black chokeberries (Aronia melanocarpa) and the sweeter red chokeberries (Aronia arbutifolia). Chokeberries have experienced a surge in popularity among numerous health circles due to their impressive concentration of important and highly beneficial nutrients.

List of known nutrients

Among all bush berries, chokeberries rank as one of the best sources of anthocyanins. A 100-gram cup is more than enough to deliver 1480 milligrams of these polyphenolic antioxidants. Researchers have identified the numerous chokeberry anthocyanins as:

  • Caffeic acid
  • Cyanidin-3-galactoside
  • Delphinidin
  • Epicatechin
  • Malvidin
  • Pelargonidin
  • Peonidin
  • Petunidin
  • Quercetin

Chokeberries contain a wealth of nutrients besides anthocyanins, namely:

  • Dietary Fiber
  • Iron
  • Manganese
  • Potassium
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B9 (Folate)
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin E

Medicinal uses for chokeberries

Chokeberries can provide a vast spectrum of health benefits ranging from combating bacterial infections to reducing inflammation to mitigating the risks of age-related symptoms and disease.

Chokeberries encourage heart health: their moderate potassium content relaxes the blood vessels and lowers the chances of suffering from a heart attack or stroke. The fiber lowers cholesterol levels, while the antioxidants clear the body of harmful free radicals.

Because chokeberries contain oxalic acid, individuals with a history of oxalate urinary tract stones should minimize their consumption of chokeberries or avoid them altogether. If chokeberries have been eaten by such individuals, then ensure that they have an adequate intake of water to promote regular urine output.

Dried chokeberries are loaded with gut health-promoting fiber, meaning they can be counted on for smooth digestion and bulked-up stool. These in turn significantly decrease the risk of constipation, diarrhea, bloating, cramping, and many other stomach discomforts. Moreover, chokeberries contain organic compounds that can protect the digestive system from unfriendly bacteria.

Eating chokeberries has a direct impact on bacterial infections, making them a well-loved food of choice during the flu season.

Low-fat and low-calorie chokeberries can serve as reliable weight loss foods.

With their multiple antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, chokeberries are equally effective at preventing:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Anemia
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Cataracts
  • Colon cancer
  • Common Flu
  • Dementia
  • Diabetes
  • Heart attack
  • High blood pressure
  • Macular degeneration
  • Respiratory tract infections
  • Stroke

Body systems supported by chokeberries

A cup of chokeberries can supply the body with 23.3 percent of the recommended daily value of vitamin C. When combined with the high volumes of antioxidants, these nutrients make chokeberries one of the best foods for a healthy immune system.

Chokeberries are just as good at supporting the following body systems and organs:

  • Brain
  • Digestive system
  • Eyes
  • Heart
  • Liver
  • Skin

Ways to use chokeberries

Fresh chokeberries are often made into wines, juices, jellies, syrups, and jams. They can be used to top fruit salads and ice creams, and can be baked into cakes, muffins, and pies. Dried chokeberries, meanwhile, are usually added to confectionery and baby food, or mixed with muesli and yogurt.

Both fresh and dried chokeberries can be eaten on their own. Chokeberries can be purchased as juice, though fresh and dried ones are preferred for their nutritional content.

Though red chokeberries are noticeably sweeter than black ones, black chokeberries have a higher amount of pigment antioxidants.

Where to learn more

Summary

Chokeberries reduce inflammation and the risks of age-related symptoms and disease.

Eating chokeberries has a direct impact on bacterial infections, making them a well-loved food of choice during the flu season.

Chokeberries encourage heart health. The fiber in chokeberries lowers cholesterol levels, while the antioxidants clear the body of harmful free radicals.

Low-fat and low-calorie chokeberries can serve as reliable weight loss foods.

Sources include:

Nutrition-And-You.com
HealWithFood.org
OrganicFacts.net
HealthBenefitsTimes.com
TastyCraze.com

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