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Quotes about Solanine from the world's top natural health / natural living authors

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Food and Healing

Annemarie Colbin (See book keywords and concepts)

Storage conditions that include light and heat may, over time, increase the solanine content after harvest up to toxic levels. Improperly stored old potatoes have been known to cause gastrointestinal inflammation, nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, and other symptoms that can be severe enough to require hospitalization.37 Cattle grazing on the nightshade Solatium malacoxylon grow sick and deformed from an excess of vitamin D, which causes an increase of calcium and phosphate in the blood, a condition that leads to calcification of the aorta, kidneys, lungs, and the back of the neck.

Dr. Earl Mindell's Unsafe at Any Meal: How to Avoid Hidden Toxins in Your Food

Earl Mindell and Hester Mundis (See book keywords and concepts)

Cooking destroys solanine.) ?Ingestion of large amounts of vitamin B2 (riboflavin) without sufficient amounts of vitamins A, C, and E and selenium in your diet may cause sensitivity to sunlight. ?Don't eat raw egg whites. They deactivate the body's biotin. ?Large doses of vitamin C wash out B12 and folic acid, so be careful about taking C supplements—particularly if you are a vegetarian—without the compensation of sufficient B12 and folic acid to meet your minimum requirements.

There is also controversy among rheumatologists and nutritionists about whether solanine poses a particular hazard for people with arthritis and other joint diseases. Until it is resolved, I'd suggest you assume that it does and be particularly careful about the potatoes you eat if you are afflicted with any of these ailments. What there is too little controversy about is the amount of pesticides being used on potatoes. In USDA tests done on 694 potato samples, residues of 24 different toxic and carcinogenic pesticides were found.

Safe Food: Eating Wisely in a Risky World

Michael F. Jacobson, Ph.D., Lisa Y. Lefferts and Anne Witte Garland (See book keywords and concepts)

Some foods, including comfrey tea or false morels (a type of wild mushroom), contain naturally occurring substances that may cause cancer; other foods may develop toxins if they're stored improperly, such as the nerve poison solanine in green potatoes. Safe Food solutions • Avoid the foods that are most likely to contain natural toxins. Never eat moldy nuts and grains. Avoid comfrey, coltsfoot, and false morels. Cut out and throw away green or damaged spots on potatoes. And don't eat noncommercially harvested shellfish.

Generally, breeders of potatoes monitor for alkaloid content. solanine isn't destroyed when potatoes are cooked. It doesn't accumulate in the body, though.42 • Remember that produce (even organic produce) can carry disease-producing bacteria, including salmonella and listeria—another good reason to scrub fruit and vegetables carefully. IN YOUR GARDEN Nothing beats growing your own fruits and vegetables, whether it's one tomato plant on your patio or a large plot at a local community garden. Having a garden lets you control exactly what goes on and into your food...

The New Whole Foods Encyclopedia: A Comprehensive Resource for Healthy Eating

Rebecca Wood (See book keywords and concepts)

However, because they upset calcium balance due to their solanine content, tomatoes are best avoided by people with arthritis or osteoporosis. Tomatoes are on the macrobiotic "use almost never" list because they are too yin, too acidic, and therefore—with long term use— weakening to the gastrointestinal tract. According to Dr. Bernard Jensen, author of the popular Foods That Heal, the acids of green tomatoes are especially detrimental to the kidneys. In the Ayurvedic tradition, tomatoes are problematic for two reasons.

The Natural Way to Heal: 65 Ways to Create Superior Health

Walter Last (See book keywords and concepts)

Potatoes contain the toxic alkaloid solanine in any green parts, and arthritis often improves when avoiding nightshade vegetables including potatoes. Healthiest are non-greened potato peels and fresh, raw potato juice. Also avoid any green tomato pulp or skin, and preferably use red instead of green capsicum (although the latter is not as harmful as green potatoes or tomatoes). Tea and coffee have some benefits but become a problem if used in an addictive way. The same applies to alcohol.

Staying Healthy in a Risky Environment: The New York University Medical Center Family Guide

Arthur C. Upton, M.D. (See book keywords and concepts)

Research at the National Cancer Institute suggests that consumption of high levels of these compounds could cause an additional 1,700 cases of cancer for every 1 million Americans. • solanine, a natural, colorless toxin that may cause severe gastrointestinal effects when eaten in large amounts, is found in the green eyes and sprouts of potatoes, in unripened eggplants, and in green tomatoes. • Aflatoxin is a potent carcinogen produced by a natural mold that can spoil grain, such as corn and peanuts. Herbs and Nutritional Supplements Americans spend $3.

The Clinician's Handbook of Natural Healing

Gary Null, Ph.D. (See book keywords and concepts)

SODIUM Fruit 25—625 ppm SOLANIDINE Fruit solanine Fruit SOLASODINE Fruit STEARIC-ACID Fruit 160—2,180 ppm STEARIC-ACID Seed STIGMASTEROL Fruit STRONTIUM Fruit 2—12 ppm SULFOQUINOVOSYL-DIACYL- GLYCEROL Fruit SULFUR Fruit 190—2,440 ppm TERPINEN-4-OL Fruit TERPINOLENE Fruit TETRADECANE Fruit TETRAMETHYLPYRAZINE Fruit THIAMIN Fruit 1—15 ppm THREONINE Fruit 310—4,228 ppm TIN Fruit 5 ppm TITANIUM Fruit 0.355—16 ppm TOCOPHEROL Fruit 24 ppm TOLUENE Fruit TRIGONELLINE Seed 0.

SODIUM Fruit 20—2,150 ppm SOLAMARGINE Fruit SOLANIDINE Fruit solanine Fruit SOLASODINE Fruit SOLASONINE Fruit STEARIC-ACID Fruit 50—620 ppm STRONTIUM Fruit 2—5.6 ppm SUCROSE Fruit SUGAR Fruit 20,000—30,000 ppm SULFUR Fruit 126—152 ppm TANNIN Fruit 2,000 ppm THIAMIN Fruit 0.4—10 ppm THREONINE Fruit 380—4,957 ppm TITANIUM Fruit 0.35—0.4 ppm TRIGONELLINE Fruit TRYPTAMINE Fruit TRYPTOPHAN Fruit 100—1,239 ppm TYRAMINE Fruit TYROSINE Fruit 250—3,593 ppm VALINE Fruit 550—7,063 ppm VANILLIN Root VITAMIN B6 Fruit 0.9—11.6 ppm WATER Fruit 905,000—932,000 ppm WATER Leaf 864,000 ppm ZINC Fruit 18—25.

The Complete Book of Alternative Nutrition

Selene Y. Craig, Jennifer Haigh, Sari Harrar and the Editors of PREVENTION Magazine Health Books (See book keywords and concepts)

Childers' claims about solanine, but the diet, Dr. Childers says, has helped at least 546 people with arthritis who tried it and wrote to him. The diet seems to work fastest for people with early stages of the disease. After a year of debilitating arthritis, Pat Claudio, a fourth-grade teacher from Burke, Virginia, quit eating nightshades and says her pain literally disappeared in six weeks. "If I eat the tiniest bit of a nightshade vegetable now, I'm crippled with arthritis for a week or two," she says. Cancer Recipes for Protection Sweet, juicy peaches.

The Encyclopedia of Edible Plants of North America

Francois Couplan, Ph.D. (See book keywords and concepts)

The most prevalent is solanine, which can produce digestive, nervous and cardiac disorders. Other alkaloids (found in the four plants mentioned at the beginning of this chapter) are extremely dangerous, and even lethal in relatively small amounts; these are for the most part: hyoscyamine, atropine (used medicinally as a mydriatic), scopolamine and nicotine. Capsicum (B 4) Pepper Etymology uncertain; possibly from the Latin "capsa," bookbox: alluding to the shape of the fruits. S. U.S., Mex. Originally from tropical and subtropical America, C.

The green fruits contain potentially harmful amounts of solanine, but are nor etheless commonly eaten in some parts of the world after cooking in sauces or i 1 jams. ' Tomato leaves have an aromatic odor: They repel insects and soothe the pain of t leir stings. ' The fruits of a few local species are eaten in South America. ^hysalis (B-F 3) Ground Cherry, Tomatillo 1 5reek name of a plant with an inflated calyx, possibly of the Eurasian P. , 'Ikekengi, from "physao," to swell up. ' Throughout. Both native and species introduced from Eurasia & tropical Am. P. ixocarpa (= P.

Safe Food: Eating Wisely In A Risky World

Michael F. Jacobson, Ph.D., Lisa Y. Lefferts and Anne Witte Garland (See book keywords and concepts)

Generally, breeders of potatoes monitor for alkaloid content. solanine isn't destroyed when potatoes are cooked. It doesn't accumulate in the body, though.42 ž Remember that produce (even organic produce) can carry disease-producing bacteria, including salmonella and listeria—another good reason to scrub fruit and vegetables carefully. IN YOUR GARDEN Nothing beats growing your own fruits and vegetables, whether it's one tomato plant on your patio or a large plot at a local community garden. Having a garden lets you control exactly what goes on and into your food...

The Encyclopedia of Edible Plants of North America

Francois Couplan, Ph.D. (See book keywords and concepts)

Bittersweet berries contain solanine and saponins. The seeds are said to contain alkaloids close to those of the deadly nightshade, Atropa belladona, such as atropine. They produce digestive, nervous, respiratory and cardiovascular disorders, occasionally resulting in death. The stems of this plant contain saponins and have been employed as a depurative and diuretic, but they must be used in moderation. Some species, such as S. rostratum (m.a.) and sisymbryifolium - introduced from S. Am. in S. U.S. & Mex. are covered with sharp spines and can he mechanically injurious.

Safe Food: Eating Wisely In A Risky World

Michael F. Jacobson, Ph.D., Lisa Y. Lefferts and Anne Witte Garland (See book keywords and concepts)

Some foods, including comfrey tea or false morels (a type of wild mushroom), contain naturally occurring substances that may cause cancer; other foods may develop toxins if they're stored improperly, such as the nerve poison solanine in green potatoes. Safe Food solutions ž Avoid the foods that are most likely to contain natural toxins. Never eat moldy nuts and grains. Avoid comfrey, coltsfoot, and false morels. Cut out and throw away green or damaged spots on potatoes. And don't eat noncommercially harvested shellfish.

Food, Inc. Mendel to Monsanto - The Promises and Perils of the Biotech Harvest

Peter Pringle (See book keywords and concepts)

Tomatine is estimated to be about one hundred times less toxic than solanine, and Calgene could find no cases of tomatine poisoning. However, studies showed that tomatine levels decreased dramatically almost to zero as the tomato ripened. Calgene researchers were concerned that by tinkering with the PG gene, they might have somehow inactivated a gene responsible for eliminating tomatine during ripening. The FDA demanded that the tomatoes be tested on rats for what is called an acute toxicity test.

Medical Herbalism: The Science Principles and Practices Of Herbal Medicine

David Hoffman, FNIMH, AHG (See book keywords and concepts)

One example is solanidine, a steroid alkaloid that is the agly-cone for two glycoalkaloids, solanine and chaconine, which can manifest as poisons in potatoes. They have the same aglycone, solanidine, but the structure of their carbohydrate side chains is different. Other plants in the Solanaceae, including various nightshades and tomatoes, also contain solanum-type glycoalkaloids. The production of these alkaloids is favored by the same conditions that promote the development of chlorophyll, such as exposure to sunlight.

The Encyclopedia of Psychoactive Plants: Ethnopharmacology and Its Applications

Christian Ratsch (See book keywords and concepts)

The plant is known to contain several alkaloids (natrine, huevine) as well as solanine (Hoffmann et al. 1992, 156*). Solanum mammosum L. In South America, the powdered fruits of this species are used as a cockroach poison. The plant reputedly is used in Colombia to "satisfy children," i.e., as a sedative narcotic (Schultes 1978a, 193*). Left: The fruits of Solanum dulcamara have a bittersweet taste. Top right: The bittersweet nightshade (Solanum dulcamara) in bloom.

The herbage contains chiefly solanine as well as related alkaloids. The unripe fruits can contain as much as 1.6% alkaloids, whereas ripe fruits are usually devoid of alkaloids (Teuscher 1994, 744). Further research is needed to determine whether the plant can be used for psychoactive purposes. Solanum subinerme Jacq.—gujaco The Witoto Indians add the ripe fruits of gujaco or ujaca, as they call the species, to their cassava beer to impart to it a special taste.

Mexican plant material has been found to contain solanine derivatives and tropane alkaloids (Diaz 1979, 85*). The herbage contains between 0.3 and 3.0% and the roots approximately 1.4% steroid alkaloid glycosides. The alkaloid content of the fruits declines as they ripen, and ripe fruits are almost completely devoid of alkaloids (Teuscher 1994, 737). The alkaloid content and composition can exhibit considerable variation (Mathe and Mathe 1979). There may be chemical races with psychoactive properties.

The Healing Foods: The Ultimate Authority on the Curative Power of Nutrition

Patricia Hausman & Judith Benn Hurley (See book keywords and concepts)

Nevertheless, potatoes riddled with green spots should be rejected because of solanine's adverse effect on flavor. Kitchen Tips: Keep potatoes in a cool, dark place, but not in the refrigerator. Also, don't store potatoes near apples, as doing so may alter their taste. When you're ready to cook, check for sprouts and green spots again; cut out any that are present. Scrub them well. To bake, use a sharp paring knife to puncture them in several places. Three medium baking potatoes weigh about a pound and will take about 50 minutes to bake in a preheated oven set at 400° F.

Principles and Practice of Phytotherapy: Modern Herbal Medicine

Simon Mills and Kerry Bone (See book keywords and concepts)

Some are combined as glycosides; for example, solanine from potato shoots. Despite being the most important archetypal plant constituents from an orthodox perspective, little is known about the function of alkaloids in plants. They may have a defensive role but many other theories are still suggested in texts, including that they are a byproduct of primary metabolism.

The Encyclopedia of Edible Plants of North America

Francois Couplan, Ph.D. (See book keywords and concepts)

In spite of these traditional uses, the leaves are generally considered poisonous in Western countries as they do contain solanine. The black, ripe berries are eaten raw or cooked in parts of Southern Europe, Africa and Asia, as well as in Southern United States. A horticultural form is occasionally cultivated for its relatively large fruits and is known as "wonderberry." The fruits are generally made into pies. Black nightshade is antispasmodic, analgesic and sedative. Externally, the leaves are emollient. S.

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